MHS offers disc golf to students

Disc golf offers an inexpensive alternative to school based athletics. MHS security guard Todd Tardie created the disc golf club at school two years ago.

By Connor Devereux | Opinion Editor

Discs fly and chain baskets clink as the Marshfield disc golf club begins practice this spring.

Disc golf is played similarly to regular golf. Each hole starts with a tee-off, and is followed by more throws until a player reaches the basket. Every time a disc is thrown, a stroke is counted. At the end of the game, the strokes are added up and the player with the fewest strokes is the winner.

The team is led by freshmen DJ Herrington, Jake Miles, Kyle Tardie and Vincent Tine. The disc golf club became a club sport two years ago under the supervision of MHS security guard Todd Tardie, Kyle’s father.  Tardie is excited for their eight week season and believes there are several very talented disc golfers on the team.

“It is really competitive,” Tardie said. “We have a lot of talented individuals on our team.”

Although the sport is competitive, Tardie encourages boys and girls who may be interested to come out for the team by talking to Tardie. A $75 fee is required to pay for the bus trips, tournaments and prizes.

“If someone wants to learn disc golf, we provide a great place to learn how,” Tardie said.

Since disc golf is a club sport, it is not sanctioned by the OSAA, and athletes must practice on their own time.

“We don’t have actual practices,” Tardie said. “However, we normally meet on the weekends at the Winsor Disc Golf Course by Ferry Street Park.”
Even though disc golf is not a formal sport with organized practices, many individuals still find the sport to be a great experience.

“Whether on the bus or on the course, it’s just fun to hang out with friends,” Tine said.

According to Tardie, the team drives up to Eugene on weekends to play in tournaments. Since disc golf is a developing sport, not many other schools have teams and the Marshfield team mostly plays against each other. However, Tardie believes he can get other schools to start their own clubs.

“We are hoping to encourage other schools to start clubs by having a disc golf club at Marshfield,” Tardie said.

Tardie said one of the reasons many find disc golf so appealing is because it does not cost money to go to a disc golf course and discs are not lost as easily as golf balls.

“It’s a fast growing sport that is cheap,” Tardie said. “It’s not like actual ball golf which can get quite expensive.”

Tine agrees with Tardie and loves the fact disc golf is inexpensive and is easily learned.

“You don’t have to be super athletic to play,” Tine said.

Whether the team is at a tournament together or playing on a sunny Saturday afternoon, the members of the team all agree they enjoy being together.

Freshman Rylee Trendell said he can always count on a fun weekend when playing disc golf.

“The disc golf club is a cheap way to hang with friends and get some fun entertainment,” Trendell said.